Race to register for Homecoming 5K

Colorado State University’s 100 Years of Homecoming celebration on Oct. 18 will get off to a healthy start with the annual Homecoming 5K Race at 8 a.m. Runners and walkers will gather at CSU’s iconic Oval to enjoy the fall color and get a jump on the full day of Homecoming festivities. The 34th annual race involves a flat course throughout campus for serious and novice runners and walkers, as well as a Kids Fun Run, led by CAM the Ram. The Homecoming Run is the eighth race in the 16th annual “Healthy Kids Run Series” sponsored by the Healthy Kids Club at University of Colorado Health. Kids who participate in four or more of the eight runs in the series earn prizes. Registration is available online. An early registration discount is available – the fee is only $20 before Friday, Oct. 10. Late registration is available for $25 until 2 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17, when online registration closes. Race-day registration in person is available for $30 until 7:45 a.m. Registration includes a custom-designed, long-sleeved T-shirt featuring Aggie orange. Other registration locations include the Department of Health and Exercise Science at CSU, which sponsors the event and is located in the B-wing of Moby Gym, Room 220; Altitude Running, 150 E. Harmony Road, Unit 2C; and Runner’s Roost, 2720 Council Tree Ave., Suite 112. Proceeds from the race will benefit CSU’s Heart Disease Prevention Program, part of the Human Performance Clinical/Research Laboratory. The laboratory provides screenings to the public and specific professional groups, such as police officers and firefighters, for heart disease risk factors. Screenings include personal and family history, a maximal treadmill test, an examination by a physician, blood lipid analysis and body composition assessment, along with personally tailored results and counseling. Prizes will be awarded to the top three finishers in each age division. A drawing for participant prizes will take place during the awards ceremony. Sponsors include CSU Youth Sport Camps, Re/Max Alliance, the CSU Bookstore, Poudre Valley Hospital, Triple Crown Sports, The Egg and I, Hewlett Packard, Eyecare Associates, the Orthopaedic and Spine Center of the Rockies, Altitude Running, Gay and Karan Israel, Ren and Sharon Jensen, Barry Braun, Markley Motors, Miramont Lifestyle Fitness, and Sam Cooper Design. The Human Performance Clinical/Research Laboratory and the Department of Health and Exercise Science are part of the College of Health and Human Sciences at CSU.

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Volunteers sought for weight-loss study

[caption id="attachment_3427" align="alignright" width="300"]Curcumin root and turmeric powder Curcumin root and turmeric powder[/caption] A CSU researcher is seeking volunteers to participate in a study on a dietary supplement that may promote weight loss and improve control of blood sugar. In the study, being conducted by the Human Performance Clinical/Research Laboratory in the Department of Health and Exercise Science, participants will be given only natural ingredients: curcumin and alpha-lipoic acid. Volunteers should be 18-65 years old, weigh more than they desire, and/or have a fasting blood sugar (glucose) concentration greater than 100 mg/dL. Volunteers should not currently be using medications for weight loss or blood sugar control. Participants will receive financial compensation for time spent in the laboratory. They will be asked to exercise, undergo measures of metabolic rate (how many calories are burned) and blood sugar control, provide blood and muscle samples, and eat the small dietary supplement (capsules) daily for 12 weeks. The investigators in the study are Christopher Bell, a CSU associate professor of health and exercise science, and Sreejayan Nair, an associate professor in the School of Pharmacy at the University of Wyoming, where the collected tissue samples will be tested at the cellular level. The two-year study, which is funded by a National Institutes of Health program called IDeA Networks for Biomedical Research Excellence, ends next summer. The Department of Health and Exercise Science is in CSU's College of Health and Human Sciences. For more information, contact the lab at 970-491-3495 or physiology@cahs.colostate.edu. This protocol has been approved by the Institutional Review Board at CSU (Protocol# 13-4282H).

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New CSU exhibit draws inspiration from diverse cultures

Textile artworkGraduate students in Colorado State University’s Department of Design and Merchandising will show off their original textile designs in a new multicultural exhibit that debuts on Friday, Sept. 26, in CSU’s Gustafson Gallery. The textile items featured in the exhibit, Diversity in Textile Design: Works in Progress, were inspired by a diverse combination of cultures. Inspiration for the designs comes from West Africa, Western Saudi Arabia, and Victorian England, as well as from the world of microorganisms and the biodiversity of nature. Each of the textile designs was printed on silk using state-of-the-art digital textile printing technology. Color is a focal point in the exhibit, both from an ethnic culture perspective and as an aspect of digital design technology. Textile design provides a unique window through which to view diverse cultures and approaches to aesthetic beauty. Creating new textiles and clothing for exhibition, alongside the traditional ethnic sources of inspiration, provides an experience that engages students and the larger community in learning more about non-Western cultures, and has the potential to enhance appreciation for multiple cultural approaches to design. The exhibit opens Friday, Sept. 26, with a reception from 4 to 6 p.m. The textile designers will be in attendance to interact with gallery viewers about their work. The Gustafson Gallery, part of the Department of Design and Merchandising in the College of Health and Human Sciences, is located in room 318 of the Gifford Building on Lake Street on the CSU campus. The Gallery is part of the Avenir Museum of Design and Merchandising. Hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Admission is free. The exhibit will be on display through Nov. 14.

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Researcher: 'Hot' yoga yields fitness benefits

Researchers at Colorado State University have produced some of the first scientific evidence that Bikram yoga, a type of "hot yoga," has beneficial effects on fitness. They are also the first to quantify the number of calories burned while practicing this yoga. Brian Tracy, associate professor in CSU’s Department of Health and Exercise Science, presented his lab’s findings in May at the national conference of the American College of Sports Medicine. 90 minutes at 105 degrees Bikram yoga is a standardized 90-minute session featuring 26 postures and two breathing exercises performed in a room heated to 105 degrees Fahrenheit and kept at 40 percent humidity. In his most recent study, which was highlighted in recent online issues of Time and Glamour magazines, Tracy measured the body’s response to a yoga session performed by 19 seasoned 18- to 40-year-old Bikram practitioners – 11 women and eight men. He found that the participants showed elevated heart rates averaging about 160 beats per minute and core temperatures averaging 100.3 degrees F, all within a safe range. Tracy also found that the body’s average metabolic rate, or calories burned, was roughly equivalent to walking briskly (about 3.5 miles an hour) for a full 90 minutes. Some practitioners have reported burning as many as 1,000 calories in one Bikram yoga session, but Tracy said the figure in his study averaged about 460 calories for men and 330 for women. Differences in body size explained the caloric difference between the sexes. Calorie equations According to Tracy, the previous higher calorie estimates are likely due to practitioners using a calculation based on their heart rate response during hot yoga, but that prediction equation is only appropriate for exercise at normal temperatures. Elevated temperatures in the hot yoga studio produce higher heart rates, which doesn’t necessarily translate into higher metabolic rates or calorie consumption, he said. “That prediction equation results in an inflated estimate of the calories being burned,” he said. “We didn’t predict calories burned, we actually measured metabolic rate for the first time. This number of calories burned can still contribute to weight loss with regular participation.” Tracy found that Bikram yoga has a variety of positive effects on fitness and lifestyle, and results vary: The participants’ age, body mass, pace, yoga experience, weight, motivation, and other factors could result in higher or lower calorie-burning and weight loss. Those populations haven’t been scientifically studied yet. Previous research [caption id="attachment_532" align="alignright" width="275"]Colorado State University researchers have produced some of the first scientific evidence that Bikram yoga, a type of "hot yoga," has beneficial effects on fitness. Colorado State University researchers have produced some of the first scientific evidence that Bikram yoga, a type of "hot yoga," has beneficial effects on fitness.[/caption] Tracy’s study builds on previous groundbreaking research from his lab. In 2008, he led the first scientific study on the physiological effects of Bikram yoga, published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, which found that muscle control, balance and strength were improved in a group of test subjects who had never tried Bikram yoga before. In that study, participants undertook an eight-week, 24-session yoga program and showed measurably better results than a control group that remained inactive. In a subsequent 2013 research paper in the same journal, Tracy and his co-authors reported that the subjects showed significant gains in spine, hamstring and shoulder flexibility and improved whole body strength, but cardiovascular performance and aerobic fitness remained largely unchanged, probably due to the brief training period and beginning healthy cardiovascular status of the participants. Tracy’s latest research was funded by Bikram’s Yoga College of India and PURE Action, Inc., a yoga research and education nonprofit advocacy group, neither of which had prior review or control over the results of the study. In addition to collaborators Apurba Mukherjee from the Bikram College and Stacy Hunter from PURE Action, co-authors were CSU doctoral student Megan Fritz and research assistant Amy Grossman. Research lacking Tracy said that considering its popularity and volume of anecdotal positive health effects, there is a dearth of research on Bikram yoga; he and various co-authors have produced two of the five peer-reviewed papers that have been published on the physiological effects of the regimen. The paper on the new study, which would be the sixth, is still being drafted for publication. Bikram yoga, a style introduced to the United States in the 1970s by Bikram Choudhury, is offered at hundreds of licensed studios around the world, taught by instructors who have undergone a specific training program by Bikram’s Yoga College of India, based in Los Angeles. The Department of Health and Exercise Science is in the College of Health and Human Sciences at CSU.

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