In memory: Harry J. Campbell

A beloved Fort Collins Navy veteran died this week following a months-long battle with cancer.campbell obit Harry Campbell, 65, a popular installment from the Fort Collins Coloradoan summer series This is Fort Collins, was admitted to hospice care Thursday with stage 4 neuroendocrine cancer. He was diagnosed with the disease this summer and died Tuesday morning. Campbell served in the U.S. Navy for 20 years, joining shortly after graduating Fort Collins High School "when it was still the only high school in town," he said during a Memorial Day interview with the Coloradoan. He retired a chief petty officer after working much of his career in nuclear reactors and "all the nuclear areas." He openly shared the heartbreak of returning home on leave to a country ungrateful of his service. He was almost denied entrance to a high school prom because he was in uniform. His son Eric remembers his father as a man who "was always there, no matter what and no matter when." "The hero they read about was my hero," Eric wrote in an email to the Coloradoan shortly after Campbell entered hospice care. He was married to Jennifer Campbell for 43 years and had five children: Amanda Johnson, Eric Campbell, Kenny Campbell, Rebecca Campbell and Shannon Krile. He was the proud grandfather of nine grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. His 10th grandchild is due next month. Campbell worked in Colorado State University's mechanical service shop until his illness became too great this fall, Eric said. He was on leave at the time of his death but had not retired. In a previous interview with the Coloradoan, Campbell said his work gave him "a reason to get up" and the opportunity to train the next generation. In his free time, Campbell spent time with other veterans and worked with youths "at all levels" of baseball, soccer and wrestling. "He was the most selfless man I've ever known," Eric said Tuesday. "We never had the nicest things. We weren't the richest family growing up, but he always made us feel we were the most important things in his life, no matter how hard he had to work." A funeral service will begin at noon Friday at Timberline Church, 2908 S. Timberline Road. Campbell will be honored with a U.S. Navy gun salute at his graveside at Grandview Cemetery.   Reprinted with permission from the Coloradoan

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In memory: Warren Santistevan

Warren Santistevan, of Waverly, died September 5. He was 64 years old. warren obit He was born in Fort Collins on August 3, 1951, to Agosto and Ceria Santistevan. He spent his entire life as a resident of the Fort Collins area. Warren married Janet Barry in 1976 and they shared a lifetime of happiness together. He worked for Colorado State University for more than 26 years in Facilities Management. His lifelong passions included horses, the outdoors, and his family. Survivors include his wife Janet; sons Dean and Darren; his brother Harold; and his beloved grandchildren Marco, Taylor, Elena, Riley, and Matthew. A memorial will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 12, at Bohlender Funeral Chapel.

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In memory: Jerry Eckert

Updated August 17, 2015 A celebration of Jerry’s life will be held from 3-5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 10 in the Cherokee Ballroom in the Lory Student Center. Original post (July 2) Dr. Jerry Eckert, born on March 29, 1939, passed away on May 27. Jerry Eckert was an emeritus professor at Colorado State University, where he taught and conducted research in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics from 1972-2005. As an academic, he wrote nearly 200 articles and professional papers, two of which won best published article awards.jerry eckert In addition to his academic pursuits, Jerry worked on many international projects, ultimately living more than 20 years in South Asia and Southern Africa. His work redirected agricultural and labor policies in Pakistan and Lesotho and contributed to food grain self-sufficiency in Pakistan and The Gambia. In South Africa, where he worked at the University of Cape Town, the Development Bank of Southern Africa and the University of Stellenbosch, his research and writing spurred the apartheid government to accelerate change by creating a more inclusive middle class. He developed the framework for an interracial dialogue on rights in South Africa leading, ultimately, to a new bill of rights in 1997. Following the first open elections in South Africa in 1994, Jerry helped to develop an economic growth strategy for the incoming Mandela government. At CSU, he also served as DARE Faculty Council representative for several years and later as associate director of Society of Senior Scholars, promoting the involvement of retired faculty in the broader CSU community. Following his retirement in 2005, Jerry immersed himself in his twin passions of hiking and nonfiction writing. Jerry’s early nonfiction celebrated the natural world, especially wildlife, in American and Pakistani outdoor magazines. His literary nonfiction has appeared in Pilgrimage, Matter, the Superstition Review, Weber: The Contemporary West, Memoir Journal, Ruminate, and elsewhere. “Mahlapane’s Story,” first published in the Superstition Review, won the Northern Colorado Writers 2011 essay competition. His soon-to-be published memoir entitled “Weeping Kings and Wild Boars: Moments of Magic and Sorrow from Forty Years of Trying to Save the World” recently won the first place award in the Northern Colorado Writers Top of the Mountain Book Award. Jerry and his wife, Betty, divided their time between Fort Collins and Vail, Arizona, hiking the central Rockies in the summer and the southern Rockies in winter. He is survived by his wife, Betty, their four children, Erin Eckert, Traci Cooley, Scott Eckert, and Todd Doss, seven grandchildren and two sisters. He will be missed enormously. A memorial service to celebrate Jerry’s life will be held at CSU later in September. Memorial donations may be made to the National Park Foundation (http://www.nationalparks.org).

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