In memory: Harry J. Campbell

A beloved Fort Collins Navy veteran died this week following a months-long battle with cancer.campbell obit Harry Campbell, 65, a popular installment from the Fort Collins Coloradoan summer series This is Fort Collins, was admitted to hospice care Thursday with stage 4 neuroendocrine cancer. He was diagnosed with the disease this summer and died Tuesday morning. Campbell served in the U.S. Navy for 20 years, joining shortly after graduating Fort Collins High School "when it was still the only high school in town," he said during a Memorial Day interview with the Coloradoan. He retired a chief petty officer after working much of his career in nuclear reactors and "all the nuclear areas." He openly shared the heartbreak of returning home on leave to a country ungrateful of his service. He was almost denied entrance to a high school prom because he was in uniform. His son Eric remembers his father as a man who "was always there, no matter what and no matter when." "The hero they read about was my hero," Eric wrote in an email to the Coloradoan shortly after Campbell entered hospice care. He was married to Jennifer Campbell for 43 years and had five children: Amanda Johnson, Eric Campbell, Kenny Campbell, Rebecca Campbell and Shannon Krile. He was the proud grandfather of nine grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. His 10th grandchild is due next month. Campbell worked in Colorado State University's mechanical service shop until his illness became too great this fall, Eric said. He was on leave at the time of his death but had not retired. In a previous interview with the Coloradoan, Campbell said his work gave him "a reason to get up" and the opportunity to train the next generation. In his free time, Campbell spent time with other veterans and worked with youths "at all levels" of baseball, soccer and wrestling. "He was the most selfless man I've ever known," Eric said Tuesday. "We never had the nicest things. We weren't the richest family growing up, but he always made us feel we were the most important things in his life, no matter how hard he had to work." A funeral service will begin at noon Friday at Timberline Church, 2908 S. Timberline Road. Campbell will be honored with a U.S. Navy gun salute at his graveside at Grandview Cemetery.   Reprinted with permission from the Coloradoan

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In memory: Warren Santistevan

Warren Santistevan, of Waverly, died September 5. He was 64 years old. warren obit He was born in Fort Collins on August 3, 1951, to Agosto and Ceria Santistevan. He spent his entire life as a resident of the Fort Collins area. Warren married Janet Barry in 1976 and they shared a lifetime of happiness together. He worked for Colorado State University for more than 26 years in Facilities Management. His lifelong passions included horses, the outdoors, and his family. Survivors include his wife Janet; sons Dean and Darren; his brother Harold; and his beloved grandchildren Marco, Taylor, Elena, Riley, and Matthew. A memorial will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 12, at Bohlender Funeral Chapel.

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In memory: Jerry Eckert

Updated August 17, 2015 A celebration of Jerry’s life will be held from 3-5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 10 in the Cherokee Ballroom in the Lory Student Center. Original post (July 2) Dr. Jerry Eckert, born on March 29, 1939, passed away on May 27. Jerry Eckert was an emeritus professor at Colorado State University, where he taught and conducted research in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics from 1972-2005. As an academic, he wrote nearly 200 articles and professional papers, two of which won best published article awards.jerry eckert In addition to his academic pursuits, Jerry worked on many international projects, ultimately living more than 20 years in South Asia and Southern Africa. His work redirected agricultural and labor policies in Pakistan and Lesotho and contributed to food grain self-sufficiency in Pakistan and The Gambia. In South Africa, where he worked at the University of Cape Town, the Development Bank of Southern Africa and the University of Stellenbosch, his research and writing spurred the apartheid government to accelerate change by creating a more inclusive middle class. He developed the framework for an interracial dialogue on rights in South Africa leading, ultimately, to a new bill of rights in 1997. Following the first open elections in South Africa in 1994, Jerry helped to develop an economic growth strategy for the incoming Mandela government. At CSU, he also served as DARE Faculty Council representative for several years and later as associate director of Society of Senior Scholars, promoting the involvement of retired faculty in the broader CSU community. Following his retirement in 2005, Jerry immersed himself in his twin passions of hiking and nonfiction writing. Jerry’s early nonfiction celebrated the natural world, especially wildlife, in American and Pakistani outdoor magazines. His literary nonfiction has appeared in Pilgrimage, Matter, the Superstition Review, Weber: The Contemporary West, Memoir Journal, Ruminate, and elsewhere. “Mahlapane’s Story,” first published in the Superstition Review, won the Northern Colorado Writers 2011 essay competition. His soon-to-be published memoir entitled “Weeping Kings and Wild Boars: Moments of Magic and Sorrow from Forty Years of Trying to Save the World” recently won the first place award in the Northern Colorado Writers Top of the Mountain Book Award. Jerry and his wife, Betty, divided their time between Fort Collins and Vail, Arizona, hiking the central Rockies in the summer and the southern Rockies in winter. He is survived by his wife, Betty, their four children, Erin Eckert, Traci Cooley, Scott Eckert, and Todd Doss, seven grandchildren and two sisters. He will be missed enormously. A memorial service to celebrate Jerry’s life will be held at CSU later in September. Memorial donations may be made to the National Park Foundation (http://www.nationalparks.org).

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In memory: Joseph L. Weitz

Joseph L. "Joe" Weitz, 93, died Wednesday, July 22, in Fort Collins. Survivors include his wife, Jean C. Weitz; their daughter Sally Weitz-Michie (Rex Michie) of New Braunfels, Texas; their son, Leonard Weitz (Maureen) of Fort Collins; and their daughter Phoebe Weitz of Fort Collins; as well as their grandson, Michael Weitz (Leila) of Denver; nieces, nephews, great-nieces and nephews and cousins. His parents, Leonard and Marie Weitz, his brother, John Weitz, and his granddaughter, Valerie Weitz, preceded him in death.weitz obit Joe was born June 2, 1922, in Lakewood, Ohio. He attended Western Reserve Academy in Hudson, Ohio, where he was captain of the swim team. During the summer of 1939 Joe went to Germany as an exchange student. He enlisted in the Army Air Force and received an honorable discharge in 1943. He earned his bachelor’s degree in 1944 at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, where he was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. Joe was also a member of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society. In 1946 he received a master of science degree from Yale University, from which he earned a PhD in 1954. He did his doctoral field studies in Newfoundland. With J.D. Love and R.K. Hose, J.L. Weitz co-authored the 1954 geologic map of Wyoming. Joe married Jean Corthell of Laramie, Wyoming, in December, 1949, where the two had met while he was working with the US Geological Survey. He joined his father’s company, Independent Explosives Company in Pennsylvania, as assistant to the president, from 1955 to 1958; then from 1958 to 1960 he taught at his alma mater, Wesleyan University. The family came to the Fort Collins area in 1960 when he took a position as professor of geology at Colorado State University, retiring in 1983. He spent a year as an associate professor at Hanover College in Indiana in 1961-62. From 1967 to 1969 he served as director of the Earth Science Curriculum Project, which was under the aegis of the National Science Foundation. He was a fellow of the Geological Society of America, a member of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, and professor of geology one summer at CSU’s Pingree Park campus. He also served a term as president of the southwest section of the National Association of Geology Teachers. A member of the American Geological Institute, he edited the Journal of Geological Education for a time. He authored several publications for the US Geological Survey. His book, A Definitive Study of Your Future in Geology, which begins with the sentence, “It is likely that the first person on the moon will be a geologist,” was published in 1966. Joe did significant summer field work for US Geological Survey in Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, Connecticut, Colorado and Switzerland. The Weitzes lived in Timnath for a number of years before relocating to a smaller home in Fort Collins. While in Timnath Joe was a member of the volunteer fire department, which participated in fighting the Old Main fire in May, 1970. Jean and Joe have spent the last two years of Joe’s life at The Worthington in Fort Collins. After retirement, Jean and Joe traveled frequently with the Friendship Force of Northern Colorado, a world-wide foreign exchange program. Joe was also active in the Front Range Forum, an educational program through the Fort Collins Senior Center. He and Jean helped establish the organization more than 20 years ago, and Joe both participated in and facilitated classes. Joe volunteered at the former Fort Collins Museum, arranging and cataloging its mineral collection. Distilling a long, productive life to a few hundred words barely touches the surface of the man who excelled professionally, lived richly, had a lively sense of humor, and was loved and respected by family and friends. Those who knew him are invited to share their personal memories and stories on this site. If desired, memorial contributions may be made to AmeriCares at 88 Hamilton Ave., Stamford, CT USA 06902 or 1-800-486-HELP (4357) or Info@AmeriCares.org. A memorial service will be held at 2:30 p.m., Sunday, August 23rd, at the Fort Collins Senior Center, 1200 Raintree Drive, Fort Collins.

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In memory: John Arthur Mulnix

On Thursday, July 16, John Arthur Mulnix, age 76, departed this earth for a well-earned rest with his Savior. He died peacefully in Loveland, surrounded by his family. He was born January 17, 1939, in Colorado Springs to Juanita Bell and Lester Leroy Mulnix. He was a third generation native Coloradoan, and spent the majority of his childhood in Colorado Springs. He graduated high school in 1957 from the American School in Stuttgart, Germany. john mulnix He married Charlene June Keller on August 20, 1961, at Trinity Lutheran Church in Fort Collins, where he was a long-time member. He graduated veterinary school in 1963 at Colorado State University and went on to earn his Master of Science in physiology from there. He devoted his life to the practice of veterinary medicine. His expert, dedicated and loving care of animals came from his heart. He rose to the highest levels of professional recognition and esteem in academic circles, and he especially relished his time in the class and exam rooms. There he shared his gifts as a brilliant diagnostician, teaching his students those critically important techniques and skills. He held professorships at Cornell University, Colorado State University and the University of Utrecht in Utrecht, Holland and conducted research at each of those institutions. Even though he did not seek out recognition it seemed to find him. In his career he presented more than one hundred seminars and papers across the world. He authored and edited numerous journal and textbook publications. He began his career in private practice in Lubbock, Texas, and his career ended after more than thirty years of managing his own practice in Colorado. He was married to Charlene for fifty-four years. We appreciate and thank him for being so deeply committed to his family and for being a devoted husband and father. He was a loyal and steadfast friend to so many. Throughout his life what he most loved was the time he spent with his family, the time he spent in nature with family and friends. Those of us who knew and loved him were continually in awe of his ability to overcome extreme obstacles, endure pain and amaze medical professionals with his resilience and strong will to live. We will forever remember his generosity and kindness, his humility and grace. He is survived by his wife, his children and grandchildren, brothers and sisters, aunts and an uncle, nieces, nephews and cousins, and far too many friends to count.....a very bright light has been added to the heavens. Our family wishes to express our deep and sincere gratitude to the many incredible people who gave our father exceptional care. The physicians, nurses, and other specialists who helped him and us through this difficult time are amazing to us and we know the sacrifices they made for him, thank you Medical Center of the Rockies! A memorial service will be held at 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 28, at Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 E. Stuart.  

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In memory: George Splittgerber

George Emil Hugo Splittgerber was born on January 25, 1918, on a homestead in the Prairie Center, Wyo., community to parents Hugo and Mathea (Jorgensen) Splittgerber. He spent early childhood in Stanton, Neb., and received degrees in chemistry from the University of Nebraska in 1939 and a doctorate from Kansas State University in 1960.George Splittgerber Mr. Splittgerber worked as an industrial chemist for the Victor Chemical Works in Chicago Heights, Illinois, from 1940-42, and for the Sinclair Research and Development Company in East Chicago, Indiana, from 1942 to 1948, where he was engaged in laboratory and pilot plant research on synthetic rubber during World War II, and on lubricating oil additives after the war. He married Pearle Damkroger of DeWitt, Nebraska, in 1942. In 1948 the family moved to Fort Collins and that fall George began his 40 year teaching career at Colorado State University. He spent summers in the early 1960s working with the hydrology branch of the U.S. Geological Survey studying the effects of mono-molecular films in reducing evaporation from water reservoirs. He served as director of eight National Science Foundation Summer Institutes for high school chemistry teachers at Colorado State University, the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, and Loyola University in New Orleans. The Summer Institutes were attended by teachers from across the United States and among other topics, provided information about expectations for high school science background for incoming students planning to attend Colorado State University, the University of Colorado, or the University of Northern Colorado. He served as chairman of the Committee on Institutes and Conferences of the Division of Chemical Education of the American Chemical Society, and as assistant chairman of the Colorado State University chemistry department for much of the 1970s, He retired from the university in 1988 after 40 years of service, continuing to make daily treks to the CSU library to read, relax and continue his personal research activities. In 2015, the George Splittgerber Scholarship in Chemistry was created by Dr. Glenn Boutilier and his wife Donna to honor George as a longtime professor. His hobbies included writing, photography, music, and genealogical research. He was a member of various professional and honorary science and mathematics organizations. He was an active member of Trinity Lutheran Church in Fort Collins for more than 66 years, where he served in many capacities, from Sunday school superintendent to chairman of the church council. As an avid traveler, George visited each of the 50 states at least twice, most of the Canadian provinces, and most countries of western Europe. He was an enthusiastic devotee of the Elderhostel Program, and attended more than 40 such programs across the country.   His favorites included those at the Oregon Bach Festivals at the University of Oregon, and the Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University, in Baltimore, MD. George Splittgerber was preceded in death by Pearle, his wife of 56 years; a granddaughter, Elizabeth; his parents; brother Ernest, and sister Bernice. He is survived by three sons, Ronald (and Vicky), Richard (and Meredith), and Gary, all of Fort Collins; by five grandchildren, Wendy (and Jeremy Eades), Heidi (and Victor Zuniga), Holly (and Nate Tuck), Johnathan (and Missy Splittgerber), and Emily Splittgerber, all of Fort Collins; and eight great grandchildren. A celebration of life service will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday July 25, Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 East Stuart Street in Fort Collins. In lieu of flowers or gifts, the family requests that contributions be made to the George Splittgerber Scholarship at Colorado State University. Online donations may be made.

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