CSU offers online bachelor’s degree in economics

Colorado State University recently launched its online Bachelor of Arts in Economics to provide undergraduate students a solid understanding of how to interpret data, policy, and research to inform decisions. The degree is designed to take students beyond math and finance, into an understanding of how economics affect everyday life. Preparing industry leadersECON-homepage-feature Offered through the College of Liberal Arts, our economics degree prepares individuals to think more broadly and critically through a blended curriculum that merges technical knowledge with an understanding of how human behavior influences economic systems. As a university, we believe it is important to equip students with a wide range of perspectives so they are able to analyze complex problems from multiple angles – a valuable skill in today’s rapidly changing global marketplace. Creating career paths “Economics is a truly interesting and important subject that opens many doors in business, law, government and academia,” explained Dr. Steven Shulman, economics professor and chair. “A degree in economics sends employers a signal that you understand how the economy works, that you have useful quantitative and analytical skills, and that you are intellectually ambitious.” The economy dominates the future of every business. Those with the power to understand it, interpret its impact, and make informed decisions and predictions based on it can create a future for themselves in any industry. Examples include:

  • Public policy
  • Real estate
  • Finance
  • Government
  • Business
  • Non-profit
  • Education
  • Consulting
  • Banking
Open for registration now The new Bachelor of Arts in Economics is currently accepting students for the Summer and Fall 2015 semesters. Applications are due May 1 and June 1 respectively. Those interested in the program should contact the CSU OnlinePlus Student Success Team with any questions, 970-492-4898. About CSU OnlinePlus Colorado State University OnlinePlus has more than 45 years of experience delivering online and distance education. We support the University's land-grant mission of expanding access to education by connecting students who cannot, or choose not to, come to campus with Colorado State's renowned faculty, research, and academic curricula. CSU OnlinePlus is a division of the Office of Engagement, which strengthens CSU’s ability to achieve excellence in the areas of teaching and learning, retention and graduation, admissions and access, and engagement and service and assists communities through engagement, scientific discovery, and regional research. For more information about Colorado State University OnlinePlus, visit the website or call (970) 491-5288.

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Online student works to combat climate change

Colorado State University students aren’t just in Fort Collins. In fact, thousands of current students live all over the nation and the world. Tracy Wang is an applied statistics master’s student who lives in Seattle in her own laboratory — an ex-Army steel tugboat converted into a net-zero energy home. [embed]https://www.youtube.com/embed/EWLxu9xumxE[/embed] CSU’s online programs make it possible for those not able to come to campus to enroll in the University’s programs, study with faculty, and earn the same degree as on-campus students. Learn more about CSU’s online programs at http://online.colostate.edu.

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New program lets students ski into a career

Ski season may be wrapping up, but snow lovers don't have to hang up their love of the sport just yet. [caption id="attachment_14395" align="alignright" width="300"]ski program 3 The CSU Ski Area Management Graduate Certificate can be completed in eight weeks.[/caption] Colorado State University is now offering an online Ski Area Management Graduate Certificate of Completion for students who find their calling on the mountain and are looking to make a career on the slopes. The online certificate is offered through CSU’s Warner College of Natural Resources, Department of Human Dimensions of Natural Resources. Industry Experts Help Define Curriculum Each course within the ski area management certificate is an eight-week accelerated program of study that incorporates relevant industry knowledge and best practices, as provided by CSU faculty and ski area managers. Such industry collaboration ensures that this program meets current and future industry needs by equipping students with the ability to: • Make strategic management decisions • Assess the impact of policy on ski areas • Make informed capital budgeting decisions • Improve managerial and operational efficiency and effectiveness • Communicate professionally and effectively • Critically examine the future of the industry • Employ sound financial practices • Develop positive stakeholder relationships • Balance the priorities and demands of operating within a pristine alpine environment [caption id="attachment_14394" align="alignleft" width="300"]Ski program 2 The Ski Area Management Graduate certificate is a program of the Warner College of Natural Resources, and is offered completely online.[/caption] “The ski area management program curriculum can be of great value—not only to the individuals who are choosing to participate, but also to the industry. It’s great to have young people come into our organizations who not only have this understanding of managing what is ultimately a natural resource, but it’s also terrific to [complement that] with the business acumen that can be developed through the program,” said Andy Wirth, CEO of Squaw Valley Ski Holdings. Positions Students for Career Opportunity CSU’s new certificate prepares students with the necessary knowledge to take advantage of the ski industry’s current landscape. Skier participation is on the rise, and ski areas are generating more revenue than ever before. The industry is also undergoing a generational shift, with many senior level managers looking to retire in the coming years. This provides significant opportunities for hard-working and forward-thinking individuals to turn their passion for skiing and the mountain lifestyle into a rewarding, lifelong career. “The ski area management program definitely provides a unique advantage to students coming out of the program that are looking to enter into the industry, just because it provides that holistic view of the business. Graduates will come out, not only with some deep expertise or concentration or passion, but in addition they’ll have a great understanding of the overall workings of the industry and resorts,” said Mark Gasta, Executive Vice President and Chief People Officer of Vail Resorts. Those interested in the program can contact our Student Success Team with any questions, 970-492-4898. More information about the certificate can be found at http://www.online.colostate.edu/certificates/ski-area-management/.

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Five reasons to start using Canvas now

The University’s new learning management system, Canvas, is already here. This is why you shouldn’t wait to use it:

  1. Your fall courses are already in Canvas. Course shells for all courses on the schedule for the fall semester have been created in Canvas, and all courses going forward will continue to be created automatically for you each semester. You don’t need to request a new course, nor do you need to request that your content be migrated from RamCT Blackboard. All you have to do to is log in to begin redeveloping from existing content, or start fresh in a blank course. See Steps for preparing courses in Canvas.
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  1. Canvas makes your life easier. The sooner you start using Canvas, the sooner you can take advantage of its time-saving, and—as some have called them—“life-changing” features. For example, the Quizzes tool automatically grades quizzes and tests, saving hours each week, and the SpeedGraderTM tool allows you to view and provide feedback on assignments digitally, in one place. These examples only scratch the surface when it comes to Canvas’s capabilities. Learn more about its features here.
  1. You have to switch anyway. Almost all courses will be taught in Canvas this fall (although RamCT will be available for grade incompletes and content reference). RamCT will be completely decommissioned in Spring 2016. None of the information currently stored in RamCT will be accessible after that, including student information for incompletes.
  1. Avoid losing course content. Since RamCT content will only be available for a limited time, now is the perfect time to ensure everything you need from your RamCT courses carries over to your Canvas courses. Using both systems side by side to prepare content in Canvas makes the process much easier.
  1. Help is available now. Canvas is easy to use. Like most online resources, however, understanding everything it has to offer takes time. Get personalized help this spring and summer -- and avoid the rush this fall. Training options are available to suit various needs, including: hands-on workshops, one-on-one appointments with Canvas experts, online guides and videos, an online orientation, and a drop-in Canvas Information Center in Morgan library.

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Ag Summit connects food, innovation and problem-solving

[caption id="attachment_13153" align="alignright" width="281"]Colorado State University Agriculture and Innovation Summit Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper highlights Colorado’s rise and prominence as an agricultural producer.[/caption] “If you eat, you are a part of agriculture.” This theme, and many others similar to it, were echoed at Colorado State University’s “Advancing the Agriculture Economy Through Innovation” summit held at the Lory Student Center, March 18-20. Over 400 individuals attended the summit, co-presented by CSU’s College of Agricultural Sciences and Office of Engagement, as sponsors, panelists, and attendees. Leaders and innovators Day one of the summit saw 21 agricultural leaders and industry innovators assembled at a leadership roundtable where they discussed issues such as meeting increased demand for food and educating consumers as to where their food comes from. The day ended with master class seminars focused on big data and climate smart agriculture that were delivered to standing-room only audiences. The second day of the summit began with introductory remarks from CSU College of Agricultural Sciences Dean Craig Beyrouty who outlined some of the global challenges facing agriculture including reducing food waste, ensuring nutritional security, and making optimal use of the land. [caption id="attachment_13156" align="alignright" width="300"]Colorado State University Agriculture and Innovation Summit Denver Mayor Michael Hancock discusses the strong partnership between the City and CSU.[/caption] Importance of agriculture CSU President and Interim Chancellor Tony Frank emphasized the importance of agriculture to Colorado’s economy, and that the summit was an opportunity to anticipate the future of agriculture, a future that will be impacted by CSU research and outreach. The audience also heard from Denver Mayor Michael Hancock and Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper. Hancock emphasized CSU’s strong partnership with the city of Denver highlighting the redevelopment of the National Western Stock Show complex as an example, while Hickenlooper noted Colorado’s rise and prominence as an agricultural producer, third only to Texas (five times the size of Colorado) and California (seven times the state of Colorado). The future [caption id="attachment_13157" align="alignright" width="276"]Colorado State University Agriculture and Innovation Summit CSU President Tony Frank highlights the importance of agriculture in Colorado.[/caption] Moderated conversations figured prominently over the remainder of the summit as industry leaders discussed how their businesses have changed and what they see as agriculture’s future in the areas of:

  • dairy;
  • water use and availability;
  • business innovation;
  • nurturing the next generation of talent;
  • financing the future of agriculture innovation;
  • the fast and fresh revolution; and
  • healthy food systems to guarantee safe, secure and plentiful agriculture.
The summit wrapped up with possible next steps. Participants acknowledged there were many opportunities to build on the topics and themes discussed; that additional collaborative investments were needed from a variety of funding sources from traditional banks to venture capitalists; and refining the definition of agriculture in light of the innovations and revolutionary technological advancements making food more available, accessible and affordable. Advancing the Agriculture Economy Through Innovation [caption id="attachment_13155" align="alignright" width="300"]Colorado State University Agriculture and Innovation Summit CSU Associate Vice President for Engagement Kathay Rennels talks about the university's commitment to being a strong link in the agricultural value chain.[/caption] The Advancing the Agriculture Economy Through Innovation summit was produced in partnership with Colorado State University Offices of the President, Provost, Vice President for Research, Vice President for External Relations, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College of Business and CSU Ventures. The event was supported by the Colorado Innovation Network (COIN) and Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA). Media Assets

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