OT program named 1st in nation

[caption id="attachment_5340" align="alignright" width="300"]photo of OT summer session An occupational therapy class during the 2014 summer session.[/caption] Current and former students have voted Colorado State University's Department of Occupational Therapy as the best in the country — again. In the latest rankings by GraduatePrograms.com, CSU’s occupational therapy program beat out OT departments at Washington University in St. Louis (2nd), Boston University (9th), Columbia University (12th) and the University of Southern California (20th) for the top spot. “We are honored to be ranked as the number one occupational therapy department in the nation,” said Robert Gotshall, interim head of the department. “Our students and alumni rank us through Graduateprograms.com, and this is the second year in a row that we have topped the list of 25 best occupational therapy programs in the nation. Now it is the responsibility of our faculty to maintain the educational quality that has inspired our students to rank us so highly.” The professional program in the Department of Occupational Therapy — part of the College of Health and Human Sciences — long has been recognized as one of the nation's best. U.S. News and World Report ranked the program No. 6 in the country in its 2014 survey. Graduateprograms.com reaches current and recent graduate students through scholarship entries as well as social media platforms. The program rankings cover a period from Sept. 1, 2012 to Sept. 30, 2014. Graduateprograms.com assigns 15 ranking categories to each graduate program at each graduate school. Rankings cover a variety of student topics, such as academic competitiveness, career support, financial aid, and quality of network. For a given graduate program, rankings are determined by calculating the average score for each program based on the 15 ranking categories. More information is available at www.graduateprograms.com/top-occupational-therapy.

Read More

Race to register for Homecoming 5K

Colorado State University’s 100 Years of Homecoming celebration on Oct. 18 will get off to a healthy start with the annual Homecoming 5K Race at 8 a.m. Runners and walkers will gather at CSU’s iconic Oval to enjoy the fall color and get a jump on the full day of Homecoming festivities. The 34th annual race involves a flat course throughout campus for serious and novice runners and walkers, as well as a Kids Fun Run, led by CAM the Ram. The Homecoming Run is the eighth race in the 16th annual “Healthy Kids Run Series” sponsored by the Healthy Kids Club at University of Colorado Health. Kids who participate in four or more of the eight runs in the series earn prizes. Registration is available online. An early registration discount is available – the fee is only $20 before Friday, Oct. 10. Late registration is available for $25 until 2 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17, when online registration closes. Race-day registration in person is available for $30 until 7:45 a.m. Registration includes a custom-designed, long-sleeved T-shirt featuring Aggie orange. Other registration locations include the Department of Health and Exercise Science at CSU, which sponsors the event and is located in the B-wing of Moby Gym, Room 220; Altitude Running, 150 E. Harmony Road, Unit 2C; and Runner’s Roost, 2720 Council Tree Ave., Suite 112. Proceeds from the race will benefit CSU’s Heart Disease Prevention Program, part of the Human Performance Clinical/Research Laboratory. The laboratory provides screenings to the public and specific professional groups, such as police officers and firefighters, for heart disease risk factors. Screenings include personal and family history, a maximal treadmill test, an examination by a physician, blood lipid analysis and body composition assessment, along with personally tailored results and counseling. Prizes will be awarded to the top three finishers in each age division. A drawing for participant prizes will take place during the awards ceremony. Sponsors include CSU Youth Sport Camps, Re/Max Alliance, the CSU Bookstore, Poudre Valley Hospital, Triple Crown Sports, The Egg and I, Hewlett Packard, Eyecare Associates, the Orthopaedic and Spine Center of the Rockies, Altitude Running, Gay and Karan Israel, Ren and Sharon Jensen, Barry Braun, Markley Motors, Miramont Lifestyle Fitness, and Sam Cooper Design. The Human Performance Clinical/Research Laboratory and the Department of Health and Exercise Science are part of the College of Health and Human Sciences at CSU.

Read More

Apples are simple and healthful, yet full of variety

The following column was written by Melissa Wdowik, PhD, RDN, an assistant professor at Colorado State University in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, and director of the Kendall Anderson Nutrition Center. With autumn’s arrival and October being National Apple Month, it's a great time to brush up on our apple facts. Apples_September_webArchaeologists have discovered signs that humans ate apples as far back as 6500 B.C., and this fruit has a long history throughout the world. At least 100 varieties of apples are grown commercially in the United States, with more than 2,500 varieties grown throughout 50 states for individual enjoyment. Apples can be found in many shades of red, yellow, and green, with a variety of textures and tastes. It's surprising when people say they do not like apples. It may be because most people have only tasted one or two of the most popular varieties. If the sweetness of a Red Delicious or the tartness of a Granny Smith isn't appealing, try the more complex flavors of a Braeburn, Fuji, or Gala. Texture is also important, ranging from the tender Jonathan and McIntosh to the firmer Honeycrisp and Cameo varieties. Better yet, try heirloom varieties, especially Colorado-grown. The flavors and quality will surprise and please even the pickiest eaters, and the more people buy the heirloom varieties, the more available they will become. The phrase “an apple a day keeps the doctor away” has a lot of truth to it. From a nutrition and health standpoint, what’s not to love? Apples are high in water content and a good source of fiber, vitamin c, antioxidants, and polyphenols. In historic periods of typhoid epidemics, patients were encouraged to drink water mixed with apple cider. In Ayurveda medicine, apples are praised for warming the body as it prepares to transition from summer to fall. They are also believed to cleanse the liver, regulate digestion, and clean the tongue. Western medicine concurs; studies indicate apples may be beneficial in the prevention and management of high blood sugar, inflammation, asthma, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and nerve and eye disorders. Furthermore, healthy adults have been observed to eat fewer calories at a meal after they eat a medium-sized apple. While I am not recommending a diet of apples to the exclusion of other fruits and vegetables, it is worth considering a daily habit. Apples are versatile. Raw slices go well with cheese, nuts, or turkey slices, while apples cooked with cinnamon and cloves provide a warm breakfast or dessert. This fruit can also be chopped into salads, stews, and quick breads, or used to create all-natural applesauce and apple butter. If you want to keep them sliced for snacking, prevent browning by sprinkling with lemon or pineapple juice. You can also enjoy them year-round; find extensive suggestions for preserving them here. What about apple juice? One hundred percent fruit juice is better than soda or juice drinks, but still full of natural sugar and calories without the fiber. A whole fresh fruit is a much better pick. Enjoy your apples, and see you at the orchard.

Read More