14 tips to prepare you for the Career Fair

Career Fair Colorado State UniversityWith CSU's Career Fair set for Sept. 23 and 24 in the Lory Student Center Grand Ballroom, we thought it would be a great time to offer some tips and tricks that'll prepare you for the real world. Before the Career Fair

  • Clarify your goals and know why the career fair can benefit you.
  • Prepare a resume to give to employers. Stop by the Career Center’s Resume Rush or Drop-Ins to have your resume reviewed by a professional.
  • Prepare a 30 second to one-minute introduction to share with employers to demonstrate your knowledge of the organization and to express your interest in them. Think of questions you would like to ask the employer.
  • Create your own business cards.
  • Schedule a Mock Interview with the Career Center.
At the Career Fair
  • Dress and look professional.
  • Maintain good eye contact, shake hands firmly and speak clearly and concisely.
  • Show enthusiasm and interest by asking pertinent questions.
  • Present an organized and targeted resume.
  • Don't hesitate to approach a representative or join a group already in progress.
  • Feel free to take notes.
After the Career Fair
  • Ask for the employer's business card and inquire as to how you should best follow-up.
  • If you have received any special information or attention, send a thank you note.
  • Take the initiative for effective, timely and appropriate follow-up.
*Tips provided by the Career Center. New this year New to this year's Career Fair is the CSU Career Fair app, which can help you navigate the fair using your mobile device. Students can filter employers by majors, job function, or position type.

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Students help older adults navigate technology

CSU students volunteered at a technology workshop for older adults at the Fort Collins Senior Center on Sept. 17. Students from the Department of Human Development and Family Studies and the gerontology interdisciplinary studies minor lent their time and talent to helping older adults with their technology in order to get hands-on experience as a part of their gerontology class. Attendees brought their cell phones, tablets, laptops and other technology items and take advantage of the one-on-one assistance from the CSU students. The workshop, facilitated by the AARP as a part of its MentorUp program, was accompanied by a documentary titled Cyber Seniors. The film follows the journey of a group of older adults as they discover the world of the Internet with the help of their tech-savvy youth mentors. A short trailer for the documentary can be viewed at http://cyberseniorsdocumentary.com/ The Department of Human Development and Family Studies and the gerontology interdisciplinary minor are in the College of Health and Human Sciences at Colorado State University.

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CSUPD warns of money phone scam targeting students, employees, using main CSUPD number

A phone scam has recently targeted students and employees. The scam callers have found a way to “spoof” caller ID so that it appears that they are calling from a phone number associated with the Colorado State University Police Department, the FBI or the IRS.  CSUPD has received reports about this phone scam using the university’s online directory information, and potentially social media, to find phone numbers and personal information about the students and employees they call. Today CSUPD received more than a dozen reports from the CSU community of someone who identified themselves as a CSUPD officer or investigator from a number that appeared to be the non-emergency number for the police department (970-491-6425). The person calling claims to represent CSUPD and demands money  from the student or employee they have called, threatening to arrest or suspend them for various reasons. In other reports, the caller has said they represent someone from government agency such as the IRS. On the phone, they assert that the student or employee may be facing an arrest warrant for outstanding fines or that the individual owes back taxes, and discusses liens, court dates and wage garnishments. Important tips from CSUPD Virtually all attempts over the phone to solicit payment via PayPal, Western union or MoneyGram are fraudulent. Do not share sensitive, personal or financial information over the phone, even if the caller sounds legitimate and the information they are sharing is accurate. People who perpetuate phone scams go through extensive steps to make themselves look legitimate, so information from the caller or information on a website that is or appears to be affiliated with a business or agency that they claim to represent may not be truthful. - If you are contacted by someone claiming to be from a law enforcement agency who is demanding money, hang up and contact your local law enforcement agency to verify the information. - If you are contacted by someone claiming to be from the IRS or a government office, hang up and contact that office to verify legitimacy. Report these calls to the Federal Trade Commission (http://consumer.ftc.gov/) or, if the call involves accusations regarding taxes and IRS affiliations, report the call to the US Treasury Inspector General (http://www.treasury.gov/about/organizational-structure/ig/Pages/default.aspx). - If you have been a victim of recent fraud by providing financial information to a caller, please call CSUPD at 970-491-6425. For more information about phone scams, visit http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0076-phone-scams.

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It takes all of us to prevent sexual assault

Dear campus community, Today, the White House released recommendations about how universities can better address sexual assault on college campuses by coming together to participate in the “It’s On Us” campaign. At Colorado State University, we've spent the last several years reframing the way the university – students, faculty and staff – think about, talk about and respond to sexual assault. Our frame is that it is all of “us” who hold the power to prevent sexual assault. Feeling safe is fundamental to the life and integrity of our campus. CSU’s work to prevent sexual assaults is guided by that, and a few other, core truths: One in four women, as well as one in six men and one in two transgender individuals, experience sexual violence in their lifetime. People of all genders can be perpetrators or survivors. The only person who can prevent a sexual assault is the person who commits the assault. Everyone has a role in prevention. Virtually all sexual assaults in our campus community – up to 97 percent – are committed by people the survivor knows and trusts. CSU tackles the tough topic of sexual assault, sexual violence and relationship violence -- any sexual contact without consent – through campus collaboration, education, and not shying away from difficult issues and conversations. Our extensive web of educational efforts, training, and response addresses all angles of prevention and support and, while there are too many efforts to share here, it’s important to note that Colorado State’s commitment is a national model in many respects. The university strives to educate and empower our campus community – by involving all of “us” -- to end sexual assault. We teach and encourage people how to intervene when they see someone else in a situation that may not be right. We focus on prevention through education, teaching students that it is their responsibility to obtain clear consent, that signals to slow down are a “no,” not a “yes,” and that consent can be withdrawn at any time. As an institution, we embrace an expectation that it’s the “us” that makes a difference in so many difficult situations; that there is power in the collective act of Rams taking care of each other, and Rams taking action. With this broad approach, which also includes personal protection classes, a focus on campus safety and shattering harmful myths about sexual assault, it may surprise you to know that one key university focus is our emphasis on increasing the number of sexual assaults reported on campus. We focus on increasing reports, while working to decrease the number of sexual assaults that occur on campus and in our community. We provide dozens of trainings to employees from across campus on how to support survivors who confide in them, and how to appropriately report assaults. Because of these efforts, a high rate of sexual assaults (including assaults from years ago and miles away) are reported to campus officials, increasing our numbers to a mark higher than many other institutions. We’re proud of this number, because reports identify patterns and provide important information, empowering us to find ways to increase the odds that we can reduce sexual assaults on campus. When the devastation of a sexual assault does occur on our campus, our victim advocates respond 24/7 and a team of university services comes together to confidentially support the survivor. CSU police officers are trained to provide a compassionate and effective response to reports, and to pursue perpetrators. The university and CSUPD strive to take action to hold individuals accountable for their actions. The White House charge to get involved in addressing sexual assault and violence on our campus is one we’ve already embraced, and we’re proud to be a supporter of this nationwide endeavor. We hope you’ll join us in our commitment to preventing sexual assault.   Sincerely, Dr. Tony Frank President, Colorado State University   Samantha Guinn President, Associated Students of Colorado State University   Lance Li Puma Vice President, Associated Students of Colorado State University

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Brad Udall joins Colorado Water Institute

Brad Udal, CWICSU's Colorado Water Institute hired Brad Udall as its first senior water and climate research scientist/scholar to provide additional expertise in the field of water resources and climate change. Extensive experience Udall has extensive experience in water and climate policy issues, most recently as the director of the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment and the Western Water Assessment at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Udall’s hire will extend the reach of CSU’s water research and outreach programs by linking climate mitigation and adaptation research with water quality/quantity and other sustainability issues in the western United States. He has an engineering degree from Stanford and an MBA from CSU. In his new role, Udall will build on CSU’s nationally recognized water expertise by adding additional focus in the Rio Grande and Colorado River Basins and in the area of water and climate policy needs for the 21st Century.

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CSU institute harvests sustainable garden at Coors Field

[masterslider_pb id="11"] The Institute for the Built Environment conducted its end-of-season harvest at Coors Field's sustainable garden this week. The Institute for the Built Environment completed its second year of managing "The GaRden." IBE has worked with the Colorado Rockies and Aramark, the Rockies' exclusive food and beverage partner, to develop the 700-square-foot garden in an effort to provide healthy, sustainably produced herbs and vegetables on site. The GaRden is on display for the 500,000 fans who pass through Gate A of the stadium each season. For the second year running, it has provided on-site vendors with fresh, hyper-local produce that is grown sustainably and with organic principles. The sustainably produced and managed vegetables, herbs, flowering ornamentals and plants promote beneficial garden ecosystem functions and inform the public about the importance of healthy ingredients in Aramark's food operations. The food produced is used in on-site food operations for fans to enjoy in Coors Field restaurants such as the Mountain Ranch Bar and Grille Club menu and build-your-own salad station. This year's lineup included edible flowers and assorted vegetables, including tomatoes, peppers, beets, cabbage, melon, peas, squash, eggplant, kale, carrots, beans, corn and chives. Herbs like parsley, thyme, basil, cilantro, dill, oregano and sage rounded out the palette of flavors available to Aramark's various chefs. Three different plantings occurred throughout the season, as did rolling harvests. Sustainable features of the GaRden include raised beds built from beetle-kill pinewood, organic soil and irrigation drip lines made from recycled materials. This season, more than 1,000 pounds of high-quality worm castings were donated by Rockies fan Jay Williams, owner of the Rocky Mountain Worm Company in Colorado Springs. Coors Field was the first Major League Baseball venue to have an on-site garden, in 2013. Three other MLB stadiums created gardens in 2014. The Coors Field garden is an example of IBE's ethics of sustainable design in the built environment, regionally relevant projects and educational outreach intended to spread understanding about sustainable activities and their impacts on health. Aramark promotes sustainable practices in food purchasing, environmentally responsible consumer choices, greenhouse gas-conscious building operations, energy and water conservation measures, green cleaning, greening their delivery fleet and ethically managing their waste products. The Institute for the Built Environment is in the College of Health and Human Sciences at Colorado State University.

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