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Tag "Department of Fish Wildlife and Conservation Biology"

Human noise pollution is disrupting parks and wild places

A recent study found human-caused noise in protected areas doubled sound energy in many U.S. protected areas, and that noise was encroaching into the furthest reaches of remote areas.

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Groundwater pumping drying up Great Plains streams, driving fish extinctions

More than half a century of groundwater pumping in the Great Plains has led to long segments of rivers drying up and the collapse of large-stream fishes.

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Study sheds new light on extinction risk in mammals

A research team led by CSU successfully measured habitat fragmentation for over 4,000 species of land-dwelling mammals.

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Brian Gerber drawn to study of rare species, unique biodiversity

Brian Gerber has studied Javan rhinos, Madagascar carnivores and Sandhill cranes.

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Saving Javan rhinos from extinction starts with counting them – and it’s not easy

It is very hard to count small populations and characterize their distribution accurately. Nonetheless, scientists and the Indonesian government are forming a plan to rescue the imperiled Javan rhino.

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Smokey Speaks

A size 60 in jeans, Smokey Bear stacks up as one of the most recognized figures in the United States. And of course, it only makes sense that Smokey attends Warner College.

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CSU course allows Warner students to get squirrely

The Warner College of Natural Resources teaches a class called “Wildlife Data Collection and Analysis” that actually allows students to put collars on CSU squirrels to collect data.

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Noise created by humans is pervasive in US protected areas

A CSU-led research team found that noise pollution was twice as high as background sound levels in a majority of U.S. protected areas.

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CSU students named Udall Scholars

Katie Johnson and Kiloaulani Ka’awa-Gonzales have been named 2017 Udall Scholars.

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The extraordinary return of sea otters to Glacier Bay

Using a new approach, CSU researchers discovered that the Glacier Bay sea otter population grew more than 21 percent per year between 1993 and 2012.

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