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Archive

Is sugar addictive?

It is sometimes said that sugar is “toxic” or “addictive,” and it is often blamed as the sole culprit in obesity and diabetes. While it is true that sugary foods can stimulate the same part of the brain responsible for pleasure and reward, as do many illicit substances, there are reasons other than addiction that eating could be linked with the reward area of the brain.

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Tony Frank’s message on President’s executive order on travel restrictions

Colorado State University President Tony Frank sent this campus-wide message on Jan. 29, 2017.

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Nutrition Center offering National Diabetes Prevention Program

Colorado State University’s Kendall Reagan Nutrition Center is offering a 16-week session of the National Diabetes Prevention Program starting March 20.

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Shostakovich returns to the UCA Feb. 8

The Colorado State University Symphony Orchestra, led by Maestro Wes Kenney, will give what is sure to be a fascinating concert on Wednesday, Feb. 8, with some of the university’s best percussion, string and wind players performing.

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Spring semester open forums with President Frank

CSU President Tony Frank will host open forums in spring 2017 for faculty and staff to share their questions, comments and ideas.

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Prospect Road closed Feb 13, lane impacts through July

Prospect Road will be closed between College and Remington for a month, starting Feb. 13.

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Get ready to party: CSU to celebrate its 147th birthday

Alumnus, Tuskegee Airman to be honored as CSU celebrates Founders Day.

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Professor Don Estep appointed chair of Department of Statistics

Building on his 17 years with the College of Natural Sciences, Estep is dedicated to expanding the discovery of knowledge and understanding in statistics.

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CSU professor emeritus inducted into NASA Hall of Fame

Harold Kaufman was recognized for a trailblazing ion propulsion apparatus, still used in space exploration today.

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Where the wild things are

As climate change and biological invasions continue to impact global biodiversity, scientists at CSU and CU suggest the way organisms move to new areas, or range expansion, can be impacted directly by evolutionary changes.

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